Pfizer and AstraZeneca cut supply? Some countries are afraid to take Pfizer to court

Recently, British AstraZeneca and American Pfizer both said that they would reduce the supply of new vaccines to the European Union in the short term on the grounds of adjusting production capacity. The move triggered strong dissatisfaction in the EU, where relevant officials criticized AstraZeneca for “violating the spirit of the contract” and demanded that it “take responsibility” and deliver the vaccine on schedule. The shortage of vaccines is still the status quo of almost all countries. According to the data reported by Bloomberg on the 26th, 56 countries and regions in the world have received more than 68 million doses of vaccines, and the country with the highest vaccination rate is Israel, which has received 42.9 doses per 100 people, and the United States has completed 23.5 million doses of vaccines. But even so, short supply is still almost the status quo of all countries. In the United States novel coronavirus pneumonia vaccine is currently unable to meet the vaccination needs of residents in New Jersey and New York, 26 days. New Jersey has had to close vaccination sites, and the mayor of New York says there is even “little supply” in New York City to make new vaccination appointments. The day before, Australia had just announced the launch of Pfizer’s new crown vaccine, starting at the end of February. Although the Australian government hopes to have 4 million Australians immunized by the end of March, it also warns that the vaccination rate in Australia may slow down due to the tight global supply. In Europe, Italy, France and other countries are even more angry with Pfizer, an American pharmaceutical company, because of the shortage of Pfizer’s new vaccine. Earlier, Pfizer issued a statement on January 15 that because of the need to adjust the production process, some vaccine products ordered by nine European countries, such as France, Sweden and Poland, will reduce the dose and delay delivery. The guardian pointed out that the progress of vaccination varies greatly among EU countries, and the overall progress lags behind that of the United States and the United States. Data show that only about 8.5 million people in EU member states have received at least one dose of vaccine, with an average of 1.89 doses per 100 people. In the UK, 10.38 doses were given to every 100 people, compared with 6.6 doses in the United States. The conflict is not only between the United States and Europe, but also between the European Union and the United Kingdom for the vaccine. Last August, the European Union ordered at least 300 million doses of vaccine from British pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca, which promised to supply about 80 million doses of vaccine by the end of March this year. But last week, AstraZeneca said it could only provide 31 million doses of vaccine to the European Union by the end of March due to insufficient capacity, a 60% reduction from its previous commitment. However, the EU began to consider the “transparent registration system”, that is, except for humanitarian vaccine delivery, all vaccines produced in the EU region must be registered in advance if they are to be exported to non EU countries. The European Commission’s vice president for economic and trade affairs, Dong brovskis, said on Tuesday that the EU does not want to put obstacles in the way of vaccine delivery, but should ask companies to provide more information on where vaccines are going. According to Hu Dawei, a researcher at the China Institute of international studies, after brexit, the relationship between Britain and Europe has been a problem. In the past few decades, under the framework of integration, the region has been getting along more harmoniously, the flow of people and logistics is relatively free, and the economic and trade relations are relatively close. Many pharmaceutical companies are multinational enterprises and will set up factories in different regions within the EU. Hu Dawei further pointed out that at present, Britain may have conflicts of interest outside the integration process of the European Union. If it is a small country with less strength, it may compromise after a conflict with the European Union. However, the situation in Britain is different. Now the epidemic situation in Europe and the United States is more serious, and it is reasonable to compete for vaccines, whether it is between developed countries and developing countries This may happen between developed countries or even within a single country. &The gap between rich and poor countries is widening. &The World Health Organization has issued a warning. The director general of the World Health Organization, Tak Desai, stressed that COVID-19 estimated that it had caused trillions of dollars in losses to the world, and that if the vaccine could not be distributed fairly, the world would face a double calamity of morality and economy.

Recently, British AstraZeneca and American Pfizer both said that they would reduce the supply of new vaccines to the European Union in the short term on the grounds of adjusting production capacity. The move triggered strong dissatisfaction in the EU, where relevant officials criticized AstraZeneca for “violating the spirit of the contract” and demanded that it “take responsibility” and deliver the vaccine on schedule.

The shortage of vaccines is still the status quo of almost all countries

More than 68 million doses have been vaccinated in 56 countries and regions around the world, with Israel having the highest vaccination rate of 42.9 doses per 100 people and the United States having completed 23.5 million doses, according to data reported by Bloomberg on the 26th.

But even so, short supply is still almost the status quo of all countries. In the United States novel coronavirus pneumonia vaccine is currently unable to meet the vaccination needs of residents in New Jersey and New York, 26 days. New Jersey has had to close vaccination sites, and the mayor of New York says there is even “little supply” in New York City to make new vaccination appointments.

The day before, Australia had just announced the launch of Pfizer’s new crown vaccine, starting at the end of February. Although the Australian government hopes to have 4 million Australians immunized by the end of March, it also warns that the vaccination rate in Australia may slow down due to the tight global supply.

In Europe, Italy, France and other countries are even more angry with Pfizer, an American pharmaceutical company, because of the shortage of Pfizer’s new vaccine. Earlier, Pfizer issued a statement on January 15 that because of the need to adjust the production process, some vaccine products ordered by nine European countries, such as France, Sweden and Poland, will reduce the dose and delay delivery.

The guardian pointed out that the progress of vaccination varies greatly among EU countries, and the overall progress lags behind that of the United States and the United States. Data show that only about 8.5 million people in EU member states have received at least one dose of vaccine, with an average of 1.89 doses per 100 people. In the UK, 10.38 doses were given to every 100 people, compared with 6.6 doses in the United States.

The conflict is not only between the United States and Europe, but also between the European Union and the United Kingdom for the vaccine. Last August, the European Union ordered at least 300 million doses of vaccine from British pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca, which promised to supply about 80 million doses of vaccine by the end of March this year. But last week, AstraZeneca said it could only provide 31 million doses of vaccine to the European Union by the end of March due to insufficient capacity, a 60% reduction from its previous commitment.

However, the EU began to consider the “transparent registration system”, that is, except for humanitarian vaccine delivery, all vaccines produced in the EU region must be registered in advance if they are to be exported to non EU countries. The European Commission’s vice president for economic and trade affairs, Dong brovskis, said on Tuesday that the EU does not want to put obstacles in the way of vaccine delivery, but should ask companies to provide more information on where vaccines are going.

According to Hu Dawei, a researcher at the China Institute of international studies, after brexit, the relationship between Britain and Europe has been a problem. In the past few decades, under the framework of integration, the region has been getting along more harmoniously, the flow of people and logistics is relatively free, and the economic and trade relations are relatively close. Many pharmaceutical companies are multinational enterprises and will set up factories in different regions within the EU.

Hu Dawei further pointed out that at present, Britain may have conflicts of interest outside the integration process of the European Union. If it is a small country with less strength, it may compromise after a conflict with the European Union. However, the situation in Britain is different. Now the epidemic situation in Europe and the United States is more serious, and it is reasonable to compete for vaccines, whether it is between developed countries and developing countries This may happen between developed countries or even within a single country.

&The gap between rich and poor countries is widening. &The World Health Organization has issued a warning. The director general of the World Health Organization, Tak Desai, stressed that COVID-19 estimated that it had caused trillions of dollars in losses to the world, and that if the vaccine could not be distributed fairly, the world would face a double calamity of morality and economy.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *