Aung San Suu Kyi is detained again

Aung San Suu Kyi, Myanmar’s most famous political figure and leader of the ruling party, has been detained again, and the military has announced that it will take over power. The country may face a coup. The following schedule takes an inventory of Aung San Suu Kyi’s journey from a political prisoner to the leader of Myanmar’s ruling party. June 19, 1945: Aung San Suu Kyi, daughter of Burma’s independent hero General Aung San, was born. Aung San Suu Kyi’s father was assassinated when she was two years old. 1988: she returns to Myanmar to take care of her dying mother and is involved in nationwide protests against decades of military rule. 1989: after suppressing protests and killing thousands of people, the military has placed Aung San Suu Kyi under house arrest. 1991: she won the Nobel Peace Prize when she was imprisoned at her home on the Bank of Yangon lake. 1995: she was released and regularly spoke to the public outside her gate. 1999: her husband, British scholar Michael bull ARIS, died of cancer. Aung San Suu Kyi did not choose to leave Myanmar to see him for the last time in case the junta prevented her from returning home. 2000: she was detained again for 19 months. 2003: Pro junta thugs attack her and kill several of her supporters. 2007: the sharp rise in fuel prices triggered an anti-government protest led by Buddhist monks known as the “Saffron Revolution.”. Under the protection of riot police, Aung San Suu Kyi briefly greeted the monks at her door, which sparked the demonstration, but was soon suppressed by the military. 2010: the party created by the military wins the general election by a landslide. Aung San Suu Kyi’s party, the National League for Democracy (NLD), boycotted the elections, calling the laws governing them “unfair.”;. The military then formed a quasi government led by former general Thein Sein. A few days later, Aung San Suu Kyi was released in a global celebration. 2012: with Thein Sein lifting censorship, releasing hundreds of political prisoners and launching a series of reforms, most Western sanctions against Myanmar are lifted. April 2012: Aung San Suu Kyi decides to take part in the by election. Her National League for Democracy won 43 of the 44 parliamentary seats. May 2012: Aung San Suu Kyi enters parliament in the capital Naypyidaw. Early June 2012: clashes between Buddhists and Rohingya Muslims in Rakhine state kill at least 80 people and burn thousands of homes. Aung San Suu Kyi began her visit to five European countries. November 2015: the National League for Democracy won the general election by an overwhelming majority, and Aung San Suu Kyi came to power as a specially established post of state adviser. October 2016: Rohingya fighters attack three police border posts in northern Rakhine state, killing nine policemen. Myanmar’s military then launched a security operation, resulting in about 70000 people leaving Rakhine state for neighboring Bangladesh. August 25, 2017: Rohingya fighters launch an attack in northern Rakhine state, triggering a military led operation, forcing more than 730000 Rohingya people into Bangladesh. September 19, 2017: Aung San Suu Kyi delivered a speech in Naypyidaw, the capital, talking about the crisis in Rakhine state, saying that the military operation had ended, Rohingya people had fled and the village had been burned. She is facing more and more international criticism for her response to the crisis. November 13, 2018: Amnesty International withdraws Aung San Suu Kyi’s most prestigious human rights award, accusing her of not openly talking about violence against Rohingya. January 29, 2019: the National League for Democracy (NLD) proposed the steps to amend the Constitution and clashed with the military legislators, which is the biggest challenge to the military political power stipulated in the Constitution in the past three years. December 2019: after a three-day hearing, Aung San Suu Kyi appeals to the judges of the International Court of justice in the Hague to dismiss the Gambia’s genocide charges against the Rohingya. January 23, 2020: the International Court of justice makes a preliminary ruling on the charges filed by Gambia, ordering Myanmar to take urgent measures to protect the Rohingya from genocide. November 13, 2020: after official election results show that the NLD easily won enough seats to form the next government, the NLD says it will seek to form a government of national unity. The main opposition party, the military backed Federal Consolidation and Development Party (USDP), claimed irregularities in the election and called for a re election. January 26, 2021: military spokesman general jominton warns that if the election dispute is not resolved, the military will & lt; take action & gt;, and ask the election commission to investigate the voter list. January 28, 2021: the election commission denies the accusation of vote fraud, saying there is no mistake big enough to affect the credibility of the vote. February 1, 2021: Aung San Suu Kyi, Burmese president Wen Min and other senior officials of the ruling party are detained in an early morning raid, which the military says is a response to “election fraud.”.

Aung San Suu Kyi, Myanmar’s most famous political figure and leader of the ruling party, has been detained again, and the military has announced that it will take over power. The country may face a coup. The following schedule takes an inventory of Aung San Suu Kyi’s journey from a political prisoner to the leader of Myanmar’s ruling party.

June 19, 1945: Aung San Suu Kyi, daughter of Burma’s independent hero General Aung San, was born. Aung San Suu Kyi’s father was assassinated when she was two years old.

1988: she returns to Myanmar to take care of her dying mother and is involved in nationwide protests against decades of military rule.

1989: after suppressing protests and killing thousands of people, the military has placed Aung San Suu Kyi under house arrest.

1991: she won the Nobel Peace Prize when she was imprisoned at her home on the Bank of Yangon lake.

1995: she was released and regularly spoke to the public outside her gate.

1999: her husband, British scholar Michael bull ARIS, died of cancer. Aung San Suu Kyi did not choose to leave Myanmar to see him for the last time in case the junta prevented her from returning home.

2000: she was detained again for 19 months.

2003: Pro junta thugs attack her and kill several of her supporters.

2007: the sharp rise in fuel prices triggered an anti-government protest led by Buddhist monks known as the “Saffron Revolution.”. Under the protection of riot police, Aung San Suu Kyi briefly greeted the monks at her door, which sparked the demonstration, but was soon suppressed by the military.

2010: the party created by the military wins the general election by a landslide. Aung San Suu Kyi’s party, the National League for Democracy (NLD), boycotted the elections, calling the laws governing them “unfair.”;. The military then formed a quasi government led by former general Thein Sein. A few days later, Aung San Suu Kyi was released in a global celebration.

2012: with Thein Sein lifting censorship, releasing hundreds of political prisoners and launching a series of reforms, most Western sanctions against Myanmar are lifted.

April 2012: Aung San Suu Kyi decides to take part in the by election. Her National League for Democracy won 43 of the 44 parliamentary seats.

May 2012: Aung San Suu Kyi enters parliament in the capital Naypyidaw.

Early June 2012: clashes between Buddhists and Rohingya Muslims in Rakhine state kill at least 80 people and burn thousands of homes. Aung San Suu Kyi began her visit to five European countries.

November 2015: the National League for Democracy won the general election by an overwhelming majority, and Aung San Suu Kyi came to power as a specially established post of state adviser.

October 2016: Rohingya fighters attack three police border posts in northern Rakhine state, killing nine policemen. Myanmar’s military then launched a security operation, resulting in about 70000 people leaving Rakhine state for neighboring Bangladesh.

August 25, 2017: Rohingya fighters launch an attack in northern Rakhine state, triggering a military led operation, forcing more than 730000 Rohingya people into Bangladesh.

September 19, 2017: Aung San Suu Kyi delivered a speech in Naypyidaw, the capital, talking about the crisis in Rakhine state, saying that the military operation had ended, Rohingya people had fled and the village had been burned. She is facing more and more international criticism for her response to the crisis.

November 13, 2018: Amnesty International withdraws Aung San Suu Kyi’s most prestigious human rights award, accusing her of not openly talking about violence against Rohingya.

January 29, 2019: the National League for Democracy (NLD) proposed the steps to amend the Constitution and clashed with the military legislators, which is the biggest challenge to the military political power stipulated in the Constitution in the past three years.

December 2019: after a three-day hearing, Aung San Suu Kyi appeals to the judges of the International Court of justice in the Hague to dismiss the Gambia’s genocide charges against the Rohingya.

January 23, 2020: the International Court of justice makes a preliminary ruling on the charges filed by Gambia, ordering Myanmar to take urgent measures to protect the Rohingya from genocide.

November 13, 2020: after official election results show that the NLD easily won enough seats to form the next government, the NLD says it will seek to form a government of national unity. The main opposition party, the military backed Federal Consolidation and Development Party (USDP), claimed irregularities in the election and called for a re election.

January 26, 2021: military spokesman general jominton warns that if the election dispute is not resolved, the military will & lt; take action & gt;, and ask the election commission to investigate the voter list.

January 28, 2021: the election commission denies the accusation of vote fraud, saying there is no mistake big enough to affect the credibility of the vote.

February 1, 2021: Aung San Suu Kyi, Burmese president Wen Min and other senior officials of the ruling party are detained in an early morning raid, which the military says is a response to “election fraud.”.

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